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Nestled in a peaceful, wooded community 12 miles southeast of downtown Nashville and built around one of the city's most popular golf courses, Nashboro Village attracts a mix of young professionals, families and retirees who descend on the neighborhood for its upscale living, recreational activities and convenience to many points of interest in Nashville. While some of the housing inventory -- which includes several large, interconnected apartment complexes as well as an abundance of townhouses and single-family homes -- dates back to the late 1970s, the majority of it was built during the housing boom of the mid-2000s, when the neighborhood took on an ambitious slate of new development projects.

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Rent Trends

As of August 2017, the average apartment rent in Nashville, TN is $860 for one bedroom, $1,069 for two bedrooms, and $1,240 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Nashville has decreased by -1.5% in the past year.

Beds
Avg Sq Ft
Avg Rent
1 BR
736
$860
2 BR
1,133
$1,069
3 BR
1,293
$1,240
Beds
Avg Sq Ft
Avg Rent

Ratings

44 Walk Score® Car-Dependent
33 Transit Score® Some Transit
39 Bike Score® Somewhat Bikeable

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Restaurants

Dozens of restaurants sit along Murfreesboro Road, the main thoroughfare near Nashboro Village, covering a wide gamut of styles and flavors, from Mexican and Italian to burgers and beer.

Sometimes you can't beat a steaming hot pizza. When that craving hits, Nashboro Village residents head directly across Murfreesboro Road to E. Milano's Pizzeria, where cooks knead fresh dough daily, with all toppings sourced locally to ensure freshness. The casual yet refined ambiance, offers a great spot to meet with friends after work or to take a second date. Founded in 2005 and locally owned, E. Milano's prides itself on customer service, and its friendly staff, quality food and fast delivery times reflect that commitment.

The best Mexican food in middle Tennessee, according to many locals, comes from La Terraza Mexican Restaurant, located on the corner of Nashboro Boulevard and Murfreesboro Road. Portion sizes are tremendous, so make sure you have your appetite in tow. Despite their renowned size and unassailable quality, almost every entrée on the menu costs under $10, making this local haunt the perfect dinner spot for quality dining on a budget. Menu favorites include the chicken taco salad and the chicken nachos.

Popular for both take-out and dining in, China Moon sits a quarter mile south on Murfreesboro Road and serves as the area's go-to Chinese joint. Regulars rave about the General Tso's chicken, while the beef lo mein and the shrimp fried rice also earn spots on locals' lists of menu favorites. No matter your entrée selection, make sure to ask for extra spring rolls; eating one usually leaves diners craving another, followed by another.

Nashville features abundant nightlife in the form of a world-famous country music scene with dozens of honky-tonks, bars and clubs downtown. A 20-minute drive or cab ride gets you there from Nashboro Village. Many residents, however, prefer to stay local and patronize the dives, sports bars and lounges closer to the neighborhood. Larry's Restaurant and Lounge on Murfreesboro Road has been a favorite local dive for decades, and karaoke as the centerpiece of its entertainment selection guarantees a good time for all.

History

Nashboro Village started in the late 1970s as a high-end neighborhood surrounding the Nashboro Golf Club, which opened in 1975. Southeast Nashville was largely undeveloped then, but it sprouted up quickly following the opening of the Hickory Hollow Mall in 1978.

As the area grew, more demand was created for housing along the Murfreesboro Road corridor, leading to the development of several upscale apartment complexes in Nashboro Village, including Village Green and Doubletree. Construction in the neighborhood of dozens of owner-occupied single-family homes and townhouses followed.

When the mid-2000s real estate boom seized Nashville, an already hot market for young professionals, Nashboro Village grew even more, and hundreds of homes and apartments were erected in the span of only a few years.

Downtown Nashville sits close by and houses the Frist Center for the Visual Arts.

Transportation

Nashboro Boulevard, the main street through the neighborhood, doesn't have bike lanes, but it features wide sidewalks that many residents use for jogging and walking pets. Otherwise, the automobile remains the primary method of transportation around Nashboro Village.

Abundant free parking and easy access to major highways such as Interstate 24 and Murfreesboro Road make for a low-stress commute from Nashboro Village to other parts of Nashville.

Some Nashboro Village residents choose not to drive; instead they get around using taxis, Uber or the MTA public bus service, which provides a stop on Murfreesboro Road at the entrance to the neighborhood. When taking a taxi, a pick-up must be called for in advance; you cannot hail a cab in Nashboro Village.

Cost

The cost of living in Nashboro Village runs slightly lower than the average cost of living for the Nashville metro area. Expect to pay an average of $814 for a one-bedroom apartment, around $3 for a pint of beer in a local pub and $1.70 to get downtown on a public bus. Gas prices in the area hover 10 to 12 percent lower than the national average.

Shopping

For major shopping excursions, Nashboro Village residents make the trip to the outlets at Opry Mills Mall, or they drive 20 minutes to Mount Juliet for its expansive outdoor Providence Marketplace. Both destinations feature numerous big box retailers, high-end stores and discount shops. Closer to the neighborhood, numerous locally-owned boutiques and specialty shops thrive. These include Hollywood Beauty Supply, with its wide range of pampering products and beauty essentials. Just off Harding Place, a few miles east, Southern Thrift Store carries everything from clothing and accessories to kitchenware and jewelry. A Kroger is situated at the entrance to Nashboro Village on Murfreesboro Road; residents typically head there for large grocery trips. For Latin groceries and an impressive meat selection, Carniceria Dominguez is located less than a mile south on Murfreesboro Road. For the best locally-grown produce, the Nashville Farmers Market is downtown.

Parks

Apart from the golf course, Nashboro Village doesn't have parks; less than 5 miles away, however, sits the expansive Hamilton Creek Metro Park. While this park doesn't provide exercise facilities, its more than 10 miles of mountain biking trails rank as some of the most challenging in middle Tennessee. Patrons who take advantage of them burn plenty of calories while learning an impressive skill.

Hamilton Creek also offers a beautiful lake, hiking trails, a kids' playground, abundant green space and public restrooms. Free parking and admission make it not only a fun place to spend a Saturday afternoon, but an affordable one. Various mountain biking clubs in the area meet there on a regular basis to hit the trails as a group.

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Nashboro Village Apartments for Rent

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Brighton Valley Apts
500 Brooksboro Ter, Nashville, TN 37217
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$885 - 1,300 1-3 Bed Available Now
844-317-3203

Apartments for Rent in Nashboro Village, Nashville, TN

Nestled in a peaceful, wooded community 12 miles southeast of downtown Nashville and built around one of the city's most popular golf courses, Nashboro Village attracts a mix of young professionals, families and retirees who descend on the neighborhood for its upscale living, recreational activities and convenience to many points of interest in Nashville. While some of the housing inventory -- which includes several large, interconnected apartment complexes as well as an abundance of townhouses and single-family homes -- dates back to the late 1970s, the majority of it was built during the housing boom of the mid-2000s, when the neighborhood took on an ambitious slate of new development projects.

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