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Nestled between Albuquerque's Old Town and the Rio Grande River, West Park and the surrounding area plays host to the Albuquerque Country Club and Albuquerque BioPark. It sits in the shadow of downtown Albuquerque to the east and remains cooler and more verdant than other parts of Albuquerque because of the Rio Grande, which runs through it. Despite the area's proximity to high-profile attractions and rental rates of downtown, average rental rates sit significantly below average for the city, making for it an attractive option.

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Rent Trends

As of August 2017, the average apartment rent in Albuquerque, NM is $403 for a studio, $871 for one bedroom, $751 for two bedrooms, and $1,001 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Albuquerque has decreased by -0.6% in the past year.

Beds
Avg Sq Ft
Avg Rent
Studio
437
$403
1 BR
895
$871
2 BR
963
$751
3 BR
1,554
$1,001
Beds
Avg Sq Ft
Avg Rent

Ratings

79 Walk Score® Very Walkable
43 Transit Score® Some Transit
88 Bike Score® Very Bikeable

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Restaurants

Opportunities for dining and evening enjoyment are as one would expect downtown in a major metropolitan area: varied and numerous. Vinaigrette serves fresh salads with local produce as well as fresh meats and seafood in its upscale yet unpretentious Central Avenue location, where entrées cost between $15 and $25. Generous elbow room and healthy meals are signatures of this thoroughbred of original fare.

The Shark Reef Cafe at the Albuquerque Aquarium provides a unique opportunity to watch through the massive glass wall as exotic fish swim while you devour their domesticated cousins. The fare epitomizes the standard for a museum cafeteria, but the array of dozens of aquatic vertebrates, including sharks and electric eels, serve as the main attraction. You may draw awkward looks from the nearby denizens of the deep when you finish off your order of fish ‘n' chips, but guilt quickly evaporates as the check arrives - entrees cost around $11.

Monroe's Chile has served New Mexican cuisine to residents of West Park for 50 years, and its success continues to be evident in its expansion outside of Albuquerque. Entrees range from $10 for a simple taco plate to $20 for a New York strip with a flaky chile relleño and traditional fixings that include a soft sopaipilla.

If you know a member, catch a lunch special after a round of golf in the Garden Room at the Albuquerque Country Club in the heart of West Park. The club's meals are prepared by an executive chef and served in the fashion one would expect from such an establishment. Nightlife options include the Launchpad, which rocks with bands brought in almost every night and a soaring galactic atmosphere of fun and drinks.

Movies lie a few blocks east along Central Avenue, at Century 14, and the walk takes you past no fewer than a dozen other bars and nightclubs.

History

Europeans have settled along the Rio Grande Valley in and around the West Park area since the late 1600s. Their culture and that of the Native Americans coalesced and contributed to the unique character of Albuquerque as it grew into the metropolitan area that exists today. In the shadows of downtown Albuquerque’s concrete and glass behemoths sit adobe churches and houses that date from the late 1700’s, and the history collection at the Albuquerque Museum contains tens of thousands of pieces depicting the history of the Central Rio Grande Valley. Its artifacts include documents written by the Duke of Alburquerque himself, whose misspelled name became that of the city.

Transportation

Albuquerque remains most convenient for drivers, with its light traffic and ample free parking citywide, but residents of West Park enjoy the unusual ability to enjoy many of Albuquerque’s services without a vehicle. The walkable area and close access to the downtown transit hub -- Albuquerque’s major transportation center -- allows residents swift access to the city’s network of bus routes serving the entire city at only $2 for a one-way ticket. Also popular is Uber – its drivers orbit everywhere in town, and the service comes in handy at closing time, because traditional taxis limit themselves to downtown nightclubs. If you prefer to be behind the wheel, head east and hop on Interstate 25 which, combined with Interstate 40, gets travelers anywhere in town quickly, usually without congestion headaches.

Cyclists have an extensive system of trails and paths at their disposal that link with many dedicated lanes on city streets, including shady routes by the river and desert treks on the mesa. Commutes can be made to almost any destination, but if you’re heading to the foothills from West Park, keep in mind that you’ll climb about 2,000 vertical feet over about 10 miles – a sustained, but not particularly intense, workout.

If you wish to venture further afield, the state’s modern light rail system serves the middle of the state between the City of Belen in the South and Santa Fe in the North. A ticket costs around $10.

Cost

Rental rates in the area hover significantly below average for the city, although city services and the quality of infrastructure do not. A one-way ticket downtown is just $2. Busy Central Avenue – known as Route 66 outside the city - and its loud and sometimes wayfaring traveler culture contributes to the lower-than-average cost for a one-bedroom accommodation. Crime remains low in this area, which is cushioned by closely-maintained areas like the Albuquerque Country Club and BioPark to the west, and the museum district and downtown business district to the east and northeast.

The cost of a pint of beer varies widely, as one would expect in a downtown area with its extensive array of options, but if you avoid pricey downtown destination joints a domestic beer can be had for $4.50, below average for the city. A variety of filling meals can be had for around $7 at area eateries, and dinner for two at Vinaigrette with wine will cost around $60. Gas prices run below the national average.

Shopping

Nearby shopping condenses along Central Avenue and throughout Old Town and includes the stunningly comprehensive collection of yarns at Fiber Chicks. The shop features fashionable woven fiber to suit any taste, and also has hard-to-find needles and other stitching and weaving gear.

Help out your head at Old Town Hat Shop, which carries traditional western styles and fashionable female selections from a variety of eras.

Authentic Native American art and jewelry can be bartered for in U.S. dollars at Tanner Chaney Gallery. It showcases original pueblo pottery and carvings, including those made by tribes native to the Central Rio Grande Valley.

Grab traditional groceries and household essentials from Lowe's on Central Avenue. A great place to stop in on a Saturday morning, the Downtown Grower's Market in Robinson Park is open during growing season on Saturdays and can start your morning with a breakfast burrito as you browse fruits and vegetables picked by the people you pay for them.

Parks

Seated near some of most widely-attended attractions in the state, West Park residents take advantage of a zoo and aquarium within walking distance, in addition to a number of parks.

The centerpiece of the ABQ BioPark remains its world-class zoo, which features hundreds of exotic animals, including some rare species such as pandas and Tasmanian devils, and draws more than a million visitors per year. The Albuquerque Aquarium and Botanic Gardens electrifies the holidays with its annual River of Lights, which features a colossal display of wattage across millions of bulbs.

All area parks are free, including Pat Hurley Park -- just the place for dogs that need to stretch -- and Tingley Beach, where kids can fish for free, and parents can join in if they have a license. The outside activities don’t have to remain localized, as Albuquerque hosts and maintains an extensive system of bicycle and pedestrians paths that network the city from mesa to mountains.

Nearby

Home New Mexico Albuquerque

West Park Apartments for Rent

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Old Town Casitas
200 Rio Grande Blvd SW, Albuquerque, NM 87104
1 wk
$1,100 - 1,195 1 Bed Available Now
844-443-1822
The Beach
2525 Tingley Dr SW, Albuquerque, NM 87104
2 wks
$330 - 780 Studio - 3 Bed Available Now
888-421-6959
El Vado Place
2520 Central Ave SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106
No Availability 2 wks

Apartments for Rent in West Park, Albuquerque, NM

Nestled between Albuquerque's Old Town and the Rio Grande River, West Park and the surrounding area plays host to the Albuquerque Country Club and Albuquerque BioPark. It sits in the shadow of downtown Albuquerque to the east and remains cooler and more verdant than other parts of Albuquerque because of the Rio Grande, which runs through it. Despite the area's proximity to high-profile attractions and rental rates of downtown, average rental rates sit significantly below average for the city, making for it an attractive option.

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