Greenwich Village – New York, NY

Greenwich Village has always remained as one of New York City's most prominent neighborhoods, where the artistic elite of the city blend with established professionals and students to create an atmosphere of avant-garde luxury. This neighborhood serves as an intellectual refuge for both Wall Street stock brokers and Hollywood movie stars, while NYU students discover a vibrant community ideal for business networking and inspiration. Located along the Hudson River, this densely populated Manhattan neighborhood has maintained its bohemian spirit in the midst of commercialization and gentrification. You'll find a compromise between the high-energy lifestyle synonymous with the Manhattan elite and counterculture values promoting a close-knit community. With a history marked by the Beat and the counterculture movements, Greenwich Village stands as New York's central artistic hub for the ambitious-minded. From the excellent transportation systems connecting residents to the wider Manhattan area to a cultivated community humbly proud of their neighborhood, Greenwich Village makes you feel right at home.

Schools in Greenwich Village

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Restaurants & Nightlife

A vibrant and diverse community of young university students and busy parents contributes to an eclectic mix of quick-eats chain restaurants and exclusive culinary wonders around every corner. Tourists to the Village abound for exclusive restaurants and idyllic staples, especially Magnolia Bakery from Sex and the City or the Ezra Pound and Ernest Hemingway hangout at Minetta Tavern. Locals, on the other hand, often flock to mom-and-pop Italian eateries for a quick slice of Neapolitan pizza or to several French wine bars for a romantic evening under a Parisian atmosphere. For over 30 years, the Gotham Bar and Grill has provided Greenwich residents with a farm-to-table oasis of American culinary diversity. With five three-star reviews from the New York Times, a feat achieved by no other restaurant in New York, Gotham may seem exclusive, but this restaurant has maintained a friendly atmosphere with open doors and affordable prices, seeking to reflect historic New York values while giving Greenwich residents an iconic go-to eatery for a Saturday lunch or a Wednesday dinner. With several interchanging menus, you'll always find a new classic to love. Grab the awarded Gotham burger for lunch, or satisfy your seafood craving with Ora King salmon or Nantucket Bay scallops. Make sure to arrive early, and grab a signature Island Negroni cocktail before dinner. Taste the elegance of British cuisine while giving yourself the ideal Sunday afternoon hangout at Tea and Sympathy. Regarded as an authentic British restaurant and tea shop, Tea and Sympathy offers exclusive dishes and groceries you cannot find anywhere else in the United States. Sit down with friends for traditional bangers 'n mash with onion gravy for breakfast, but for dinner you must try the Welsh rarebit. After a hearty meal, stop by the grocery shop for some clotted cream and warm scones, a combination made in British paradise. As far as the nightlife in Greenwich village, you do not have to walk far to either mingle at a quiet pub or let loose at a raucous club. Nightclubs along Bleecker Street do fill up quickly with NYU students, and tourists can sometimes overwhelm 6th Street. Long-term residents can stir up some fun at music venues supporting local artists and hidden, innovative lounges unlike anything they have ever experienced. Head over to Cafe Wha? on Bleecker after dark on Tuesdays for the weekly Tuesday Funk Night, and then return from Wednesday to Sunday for a mix of rock, blues and R&B. While watching the stage or grabbing some signature Wha? Nachos, just remember that Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and Alan Ginsberg have all played or lingered at this quintessential pub.

History & Culture

This gorgeous, tree-lined neighborhood with curved and narrow streets can trace its history to Dutch settlers in the early 17th century, but Greenwich Village really boomed into a central hub for art and urban bohemian culture in the 19th century. With foundations growing upon small presses and experimental theater, artists began flocking to this area, and by the turn of the century, the Hotel Albert on 11th Street and University Place hosted the likes of Walt Whitman, Mark Twain and Salvador Dali. The neighborhood's artistic community flourished, while nightclubs promoted the growth of New York jazz and the Beatniks of the '50s fought social conformity with poetry and literature. This artistic momentum continued through the 1960s counterculture movement. Although some artists dispute whether Greenwich Village has managed to stay true to its avant-garde roots, residents in the area can still discover local theater and experimental culture. Catch a storytelling evening or enjoy an NYU Masters' Dance Concert at the historic Provincetown Playhouse. While launching the careers of revered playwrights such as Anne Bancroft and Eugene O'Neill, this 88-seat theater focuses on combining local theater comfort with groundbreaking productions. A Halloween parade often stands as the ideal curator for social satire, oddities and revelry, and no other Halloween parade in the United States can top New York's Village Halloween Parade. Held on every Halloween night since 1974, this cultural event draws in more than two million spectators and more than 60,000 costumed performers, dancers and artists. In fact, leading cultural anthropologists have studied this parade, while the New York Times has ranked it among the best entertainment the city offers.

Transportation

As the only district in Manhattan that does not follow a grid-based urban layout and because of its usage of street names as opposed to numbers, getting around Greenwich Village by car can be quite confusing. Also, a lack of adequate parking space and narrow streets make parking in this neighborhood difficult. If you do travel by car, the Holland Tunnel and West Street allow easy access to both Jersey City and other parts of Manhattan. Many Greenwich Village residents tend to avoid travel by car as much as possible, and most daily errands do not require the use of a car. Due to world-class public transportation and streets adapted for bicycles, residents have no issues getting around town conveniently. The most common ways to navigate Greenwich Village remain by bicycle and by walking. Tree-lined streets and small delights around every corner allow for peaceful daytime strolls, and as crime remains 60-percent lower than the rest of Manhattan, evening walks are relatively safe. For quicker trips, Greenwich Village sports a healthy network of bicycle lanes, and with Citi Bike bicycle sharing, residents can instantly go from walking to biking. Don't feel like walking or biking? Greenwich Village has no shortage of yellow cabs or Uber cars. Also, enjoy ride sharing through Greenwich Village and Manhattan with RelayRides or Zipcar. The NYC MTA services Greenwich Village and connects residents with outlying suburbs and throughout Manhattan. Visit the Union Square Station on Broadway and 14th Street for access to the iconic NYC subway system. If you want to avoid the packed and busy subways, about 21 MTA buses pass through this neighborhood.

Cost

Although once the bohemian capital of the United States that promoted young and broke artists to discover and explore their artistic merit, Greenwich Village carries a fairly high cost of living. All three zip codes that constitute this neighborhood remain as some of the most expensive in the United States. The cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment in the Village remains higher than the average for most New York apartments. Along West 12th Street, for instance, rental prices hover around $3,500, while on 5th Avenue you should expect to pay around $5,000 a month. You can find more affordable options near the NYU campus, where the median rental rate stays closer to $2,000. This high rent for apartments and homes has little relation to the cost of restaurants, amenities and entertainment. Hundreds of restaurants cater to penniless university students, while vintage and boutique shopping scenes carry lower than average prices for young professionals just arriving in the city. Due to the high rent, newcomers to the area should have a sufficient income to cover initial renting costs and deposits.

Shopping

Shopping in Greenwich Village remains just as diverse as the history of this neighborhood, where common commercial interests blend with handcrafted goods and unconventional stores ideal for niche shoppers. Grab a new computer at Best Buy, take home some organic groceries from Whole Foods and stock up on toys at Babies R Us, all without leaving the stylish Village hub at Union Square and Broadway. The true shopping beauty of this neighborhood comes from a mix of both high- and low-end boutique shops. For trendy, Parisian-style women's clothing and home goods, Welcome Shoppe on East 11th Street offers luxury goods from high-fashion designers such as Vega Jewelry and A Detacher. When looking for unique items that you cannot find at the designer stores on 5th Avenue, head on over to The Market NYC on 159 Bleecker Street. Open every Wednesday to Sunday, The Market pulses with creativity as over 30 indie artisans hawk apparel, collectibles and anything they feel like making. Put on a poker face, as many sellers are willing to negotiate over certain goods. Organic sentiments and mom-and-pop shops have allowed health food retailers to flourish in Greenwich Village. Life Thyme Natural Market stands as a prime example of a locally owned grocery store, where you can find rarities such as vegan tiramisu along with organic fruits and vegetables. Many residents get their groceries from Whole Foods and the Morton Williams Supermarket.

Parks

Featuring panoramic views of the Hudson and abundant green space lining every street, Greenwich Village emphasizes natural beauty and open spaces. The area parks cater to visitors and residents of all ages, providing tranquil reading places for students and baseball fields for children. The James J. Walker Park provides an especially beautiful example of communal play and relaxation in Greenwich Village, with lines of shadowed park benches perfect for a sunny Sunday and a large playground that kids can enjoy for hours as you finish your book. The historic Washington Square Park stands as the central point and heart of the entire neighborhood. As one of the best-known parks in the entire New York area, the 9.75 acres of running paths and green space in this park have stood as an essential spot for visitors of all ages to enjoy some quality time outside. Wander and watch avant-garde artists displaying their craft, or bring a friend and fine-tune your chess skills. Don't forget to bring your dog, and make sure to sign up for the Washington Square Park Dog Run. Both Washington Square Park and The High Line tend to be overcrowded on sunny summer afternoons. For residents who really want to feel secluded, the Garden at St. Luke in the Fields transports you from Manhattan into a picturesque garden. Most pass right by the north and south gardens of this public courtyard without ever noticing they exist. Just look for the 200-year-old church between Barrow and Christopher Street.